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Changing Perspectives on the Organizational Consequences of Information Technology

Abstract:
Early predictions of the impact of computers on organizations ranged from ‘human – computer symbiosis’ to automation and the collapse of jobs. The findings from impact research show that there was evidence for all predictions that were made. This demonstrated that the technology is very flexible and can be deployed to facilitate many different organizational outcomes. However, more recent research shows that the design process despite significant progress in the adoption of user-centred methods remains technocentric and organizational outcomes are often unplanned and unwanted. The paper concludes that current predictions about the development of virtual organizations are likely to be over simplistic and that the usage of methods to assess organizational options and design socio-technical systems are necessary if emerging forms of technology are to be effectively deployed.

EASON K.D. Changing Perspectives on the Organizational Consequences of Information Technology, Behaviour and Information Technology 20(5) pp 323-328

Understanding the Organisational Ramifications of Implementing Information Technology Systems

Handbook of Human-Computer Interaction (Second Edition)

Publisher Summary:
Information technology is a major force for organizational change. Every organization that applies the technology experiences organizational ramifications. This chapter charts the development of different models of organizational effects over a 40-year period. During the 1960s and 1970s, many studies of organizational impact were undertaken that produced conflicting results. As a result, a contingency model of computer impact emerged that accounted for the different impacts by reference to different forms of technology and application. In the last decade, it has become clear that this is also an inadequate model because it does not allow for the active nature of organizations that act to shape the impact of the technology. The chapter examines nine case studies to explore the processes by which organizational impact takes place. The active manner in which these processes operate is summarized in model three. This is an organizational assimilation model in which the three sub-systems of an enterprise interact and create outcomes in each sub-system. The chapter ends with a review of the many methods now available to support this approach and outlines the need for organizational stakeholders to play significant roles in new system developments.

Human Computer Interaction User Centred Design Organisational Impact Information Technology

Google Books Link

Science Direct Link

Eason K. D. (1997) Understanding the organisational ramifications of implementing information technology systems. In ‘Handbook of Human-computer interaction’ M.G. Hollander, T.K. Landeaur and P.V. Prabhu (eds) , Amsterdam, Elsevier

DOI Link

Managing Computer Impact

Managing Computer Impact: An International Study of Management and Organizations

Managing Computer Impact describes research undertaken in eight organizations in five countries. The approach determines the impact of computer-based information systems on organizations and management. Results at several levels of analysis support the conclusion that few changes are determined by computer technology.

Managing Computer Impact: An International Study of Management and Organisations Ken Eason

Link to Google Books

BJORN-ANDERSON, N. EASON, K.D. & ROBEY, D. (1986) Managing Computer Impact, Ablex, Norwood NJ.

The Use and Usefulness of Functions in Electronic Journals: The Experience of the Superjournal Project

Value to users of a range of functions of electronic journals and their usefulness in the specific context of the SuperJournal Project.

Abstract:
For the evaluation of each of the functions three types of data were analysed in relation to each other and in light of other contextual data: logged data of usage, survey data on user satisfaction, and survey data on the perceived importance of the function. The analysis shows that basic browsing, printing and search make up the core functions of electronic journals; other functions, such as saving of bibliographic data, alerting, customising, links with external resources and communication, serve as peripheral functions. The usefulness of both the core functions and the peripheral functions in a specific service is influenced by various implementation factors. However, it is the realised usefulness of the core functions which determines the use of a service.

Emerald Insight Link

Eason K. D. Yu, L. and Harker S.D.P. The use and usefulness of functions in electronic journals: The experience of the Superjournal Project. Program 34(1) 1-28